What Are Time Signatures In Music?

This brief guide will answer what are time signatures in music, how to read time signatures, and explanations of different time signatures.

What Are Time Signatures in Music
What Are Time Signatures in Music

What Are Time Signatures in Music?

Time Signature is a notational marking used in music theory to denote the number of beats there are in each measure and what type of beats they are.

A musical staff is where we write the notes and the rests, and it consists of five parallel horizontal lines containing four spaces between them.

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What Are Time Signatures: Explained

Which particular musical notes are meant depends on which clef is written at the beginning of a staff. There are two clefs: the Bass clef and the Treble Clef.

Now in printed music, precisely after the clef, a pair of numbers can be seen at the beginning of the staff. One number is written over the other, and they are called the time signatures.

The time signatures tell us two things:

#1. The number of beats in each measure

The top number in the time signature tells us how many beats must be counted in each measure. So, for example, if the maximum number is 4, it denotes that each measure contains 4 beats.

#2. Which note value gets the beat

The bottom number in a time signature gives us the information about what kind of beat to count (or which notes value gets the beat).

For example, if the bottom number in a time signature is 4, a quarter note is one beat. On the other hand, if the bottom number is 8 then an eighth note gets one beat.

There are also two types of time signatures that you need to know:

Simple Time Signatures

Here are some requirements necessary to be considered a time signature as a simple time signature:

  • Each beat should be divided into two equal components
  • Note getting the beat should be an undotted note
  • The top number should not be divisible by 3 except when it is 3
  • The number of beats should be the same in each measure

Some examples of simple time signatures include 3/4, 3/8

Compound Time Signatures

Here are some requirements necessary to be considered a time signature as a compound time signature:

  • The top number should be evenly divisible by 3, with the exception of time signatures in which the top number is actually 3.
  • The beat should be a dotted quarter or three eight notes.
  • Each beat should be subdivided into three components.

Some examples of compound time signatures include 6/8, 12/8.

Related: What Are Intervals in Music Theory


What Are Some Time Signature Examples?

Time Signatures Illustrated on Piano Keyboard
Time Signature Type:Examples:
Simple3/4 or 4/4
Compound9/8 or 12/8
Complex5/4 or 7/8
Mixed5/8 & 3/8 or 6/8 & 3/4
Additive3+2+3/8
Fractional2½/4
Irrational Meters3/10 or 5/24
Source

How Do You Read a Time Signature?

Here’s how you can read a time signature;

  1. First read the top number of the time signature. It tells you how many beats are supposed to be in the measure.
  2. Next read the bottom number of the time signature. It tells what note gets the beat.

Here’s an example to implement these steps for reading the time signature: In a 2/4 time signature, reading the top number tells you that there are supposed to be two beats in a measure. At the same time, the bottom number signifies that the quarter note gets the beat.


What is a Time Signature Chart?

A chart that shows the most common regular time signatures is known as the time signature chart, and it also shows which are simple and compound time signatures. 

Note that you may also come across the time signatures that are not shown by the chart. But the chart will show you the most common signatures that we find nowadays.

Time Signatures Explained – Basic Music Theory Lesson

What is a 4/4 Time Signature & What Are Examples of It?

A 4/4 time signature denotes that there are 4 quarter notes per measure.

Some examples in which the 4/4 time signature is used are as follows:

  • The movement entitled Autumn from The Fours Seasons by Vivaldi 
  • Schubert’s Ave Maria, originally titled Ellens Gesang III, Hymne an die Jungfrau
  • Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne Opus 48 n°1 in C minor
  • Pachelbel’s Canon

What is a 3/4 Time Signature & What Are Examples of It?

A 3/4 time signature means three quarter-note beats are in each bar, and it is a simple triple meter. It is simply because each of those beats can subdivide into two parts naturally, and it is triple because it contains three beats in each bar.

Some examples in which the 3/4 time signature is used are as follows:

  • The chorale of the cantata BWV 147 by J.S.BACH
  • Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne opus 15 n°1 in F Major 
  • Le boléro (the Bolero) by Maurice Ravel
  • The Minuet Trio from Symphony N° 41 in C major KV. 551 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

What Is a 6/4 Time Signature & What Are Examples of It?

A 6/4 time signature means that there are six quarter notes per measure.

Some examples in which the 6/4 time signature is used are as follows:

  • Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne opus 9 n°1
  • The first movement, entitled Allegro con brio, of Brahms’ Symphony No.3 

What Is a 6/8 Time Signature & What Are Examples of It?

A 6/8 time signature means that there are six eighth notes per measure.

Some examples in which the 6/8 time signature is used are as follows:

  • Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne opus 9 n°3 
  • Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne opus 27 n°2 in D flat major
  • The movement Lento assai, cantante e tranquilo from String Quartet N° 16, Opus 135 by Ludwig van Beethoven

What Is a 2/4 Time Signature & What Are Examples of It?

A 2/4 time signature signifies that there are two-quarter notes per measure. 

Some examples in which the 2/4 time signature is used are as follows:

  • The first movement (Allegro con brio) of Beethoven’s Symphony No.5 in C minor
  • The fourth movement entitled Finale of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No.3 in E flat major 
  • Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne opus 15 n°2
  • Beethoven’s Symphony N°6 in F major, entitled the Pastoral Symphony

Summary of Time Signatures

Time signatures and measures are notational conventions describing how many beats should be in a measure and which note value comprises one beat. A time signature is determined by the beat pattern executed by the music.


We hope you found this information helpful and we clearly answered what are time signatures in music.

If we missed anything, please share it in the comments.

Mark V. at Hip Hop Makers

Written By Mark V.

Hip Hop Makers is a music production website that launched in 2008 to teach music lovers how to make music, sell beats, and make money from music.

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